Things You Can Do to Maximize Your Rosacea Treatments

Things You Can Do to Maximize Your Rosacea Treatments

Topical agents, oral medications, and laser treatments are some of the medical treatments available for rosacea, but the true key to managing rosacea and minimizing flare ups is YOU. 

Here, our team at Easton Dermatology Associates in Easton, Stevensville, and Salisbury, Maryland, shares some of the things you can do to maximize your rosacea treatments. 

Identify your triggers

Do you have rosacea flare ups after drinking red wine or eating spicy foods? Are you having a hard time finding a line of hair products that doesn’t make your skin burn? You might’ve just identified some of your rosacea triggers.

Rosacea makes your skin more sensitive, and you may notice certain items or activities make your skin itch, burn, or sting. In addition to drinks, food, and hair products, other common rosacea triggers include:

Initially, these triggers cause minor rosacea flares (skin flushing). However, every time your skin flushes, it stays red longer. Over time, the redness becomes permanent, and you develop broken blood vessels, acne, and thickened skin.

Identifying your triggers reduces the flare ups and the more problematic skin issues that can follow. The National Rosacea Society has a rosacea diary booklet that can help you identify your rosacea triggers. 

Protect your skin from the sun

Because your skin is more sensitive, it’s more vulnerable to the strong ultraviolet (UV) sun rays. Protecting your skin from the sun is essential for maximizing results from your rosacea treatments.

What does this mean? Applying a broad spectrum sunscreen daily and reapplying as needed, staying out of the sun during peak sun hours (10am to 2pm), and finding a shady spot when outdoors. 

We also recommend wearing sun-protective sunglasses and clothing and covering up with a wide-brimmed hat. 

Develop a skincare routine

Yes, what you use to clean and moisturize your skin can trigger a rosacea flare up. We can help you find a rosacea-friendly skin cleanser and moisturizer to reduce these flares. 

When washing your face, be gentle, using a circular motion with your fingertips to clean your skin. Afterward, rinse your face with lukewarm water, and pat dry with a clean towel.

You also need to apply a moisturizer daily, even if your skin is oily. Skin moisturizers lock in moisture, keeping your skin hydrated and reducing irritation to improve skin comfort. 

According to the American Academy of Dermatology Association, using a rosacea-friendly moisturizer improves the results you get from prescribed treatment.

Currently, there’s no cure for rosacea. However, with the right treatment and at-home care plan, you can minimize flare ups. Call any of our locations today to schedule an appointment with our skin care experts, so you can get help managing your rosacea.

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